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Schedule an Appointment: Call 203-323-5439 (KIDZ) We Offer Orthodontic Treatment

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Chomps in the Snow at All About Kids Pediatric Dentist in Stamford, Norwalk and Danbury, CT

Smiling Kids at All About Kids - A Pediatric Dentist Office in Stamford, Danbury and Norwalk, CTWe offer movies, TVs, games, toys and balloons as well as a totally cool and fun environment to help keep your child engaged and/or distracted during dental procedures.

Our philosophy is to create a fun and comfortable “Dental Home” where your family will want to come back year after year!

As pediatric dental specialists we treat each child uniquely.

Each child’s personality, developmental age, special needs and past dental experiences are always taken into consideration during their dental treatment.

Our goal is to provide the most pleasant experience for you and your child while also providing you high quality dentistry. Our offices are brand new and state of the art, with the most updated dental equipment.

Our office, as well as the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the American Dental Association (ADA), and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD), all recommend establishing a “Dental Home” for your child by one year of age. Children who have a dental home are more likely to receive appropriate preventive and routine oral health care.

You can make the first visit to the dentist enjoyable and positive. If old enough, your child should be informed of the visit and told that the dentist and their staff will explain all procedures and answer any questions. The less to-do concerning the visit, the better.

It is best if you refrain from using words around your child that might cause unnecessary fear, such as “needle”, “shot”, “pull”, “drill” or “hurt”. The office makes a practice of using words that convey the same message, but are pleasant and non-frightening to the child.

When should my child first see a dentist, and why?

The ideal time as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, the American Dental Association and the Academy of General Dentistry is at approximately one year of age. This is an ideal time for the dentist to carefully examine the development of your child’s mouth. Because dental problems often start early, the sooner the visit the better. To safeguard against problems such as early childhood caries, teething irritations, gum disease, and prolonged thumb-sucking, the dentist can provide or recommend special preventive care.

How do I prepare my child and myself for the visit?

Before the visit, ask the office about the first appointment so there are no surprises. Plan a course of action for either reaction your child may exhibit- cooperative or non-cooperative. Very young children may be fussy and not sit still. Talk to your child about what to expect, and build excitement as well as understanding about the upcoming visit. If you think it is necessary, bring your child's current medical history to the appointment.

What will happen on the first visit?

Many first visits are also introductory ice-breakers to acquaint your child with the dentist and the practice. If the child is frightened, uncomfortable or non-cooperative a rescheduling may be necessary. Patience and calm on the part of the parent and reassuring communication with your child are very important in these instances. Short, successive visits are meant to build the child’s trust in the dentist and the dental office, and can prove invaluable if your child needs to be treated later for any dental problem.

Appointments for small children, special needs or very anxious patients should always be scheduled earlier in the day, when your child is alert and fresh. For children under 2years of age the parent may have to sit in the dental chair and hold the child during the examination.

The first visit usually includes the following procedures:

  • A gentle but thorough examination of the teeth, jaw, bite, gums and oral tissues to monitor growth and development and observe any problem areas
  • If indicated, a thorough cleaning which includes polishing teeth and removing any plaque, tartar build-up and stains; X-rays; a demonstration of proper home cleaning; assessment of the need for fluoride
  • The dentist will answer any questions you have and try to make you and your child feel comfortable throughout the visit. The entire dental team and the office strive to provide a relaxed, non-threatening environment for you and your child.

When should the next visit be?

Children, like adults should see the dentist every six months. Some dentists may schedule interim visits for every three months when the child is very young to build up a comfort and confidence level, or to treat a developing problem.


 

Fun Activities

Tooth Fairy Letter for All About Kids Pediatric DentistryTooth Fairy Letter

Your child will love getting this fun letter personalized for them from the Tooth Fairy. Not only is it fun, but it also helps educate them on the importance of proper oral health care and routine visits to the Tooth Fairy’s friend, the dentist.

Download

Personalized Coloring Book for All About Kids Pediatric DentistryPersonalized Coloring Book

Your child will love having their own personalized coloring book from the dentist, and they can use it for years to come or you can preserve it in their scrapbook or baby book. It is fun and easy to use, try it yourself by clicking on one of the coloring books below.

Boy Coloring Book

Girl Coloring Book


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